Hot springs in Baja? - El Chorro

ELCHORRO

El chorro (The Jet), outside of Santiago



Tired Muscles?  Stressed out?  Want a different place to enjoy the water in Baja?  Want different scenery? A short drive past Agua Caliente on the east side of the peninsula, is a hidden wilderness hot spring (agua termales) that can help relieve that tension!

The hot springs are located at the road´s end of the canyon about 6km northwest of the small, charming pueblo of Agua Caliente.  (Don´t worry, there are no major turn-offs from Agua Caliente to the hot springs, to make this difficult!)  Agua Caliente and Santiago are farming communities west of Highway 1. To get there, head north from San Jose on Highway 1.  The Santiago turnoff is well past the airport, and Miraflores, but, it is on a well marked, paved road going to the west from the main highway.  Santiago is a traditional Mexican farming pueblo, with the obligatory town plaza, and a very charming old church.  La Laguna, right adjacent to Santiago proper, even has a marshy lagoon filled with spectacular water reeds, cattails, hyacinth and palms.  And the area is green and lush; another excellent photo opportunity. Spend some time in Santiago, its tranquillity and simple charm will rub off!  

Santiago is also home to the only zoo in all of Baja Sur, that I know of.  The zoo is northwest of the town plaza, and the directions are well marked with signs.  It is a very simple zoo, hosting a fraction of the animals you would see in big cities, but, being the only zoo in all of Baja California Sur, it is well used by families, especially on the weekend.  In fact, my grandson, Gabriel, who is my regular Sunday exploring buddy (2-1/2 years old), experienced his first zoo, right there!  His little eyes, became as big as saucers and the squeals of joy and delight he made seeing these animals, was echoed throughout the park by Mexican children enjoying their new discoveries as well.  It is worth a visit.  But be sure and drop some money in the collection box when you leave.  The zoo is free, but I am told, that the animals´ food and care comes directly from the donations made in this box.  Be generous.

When you are ready, continue on the zoo road, which, immediately after the zoo becomes a serviced dirt road to Agua Caliente is about 8 kms west of Santiago.  Keep on the main dirt road.  You will not get lost. 

Agua Caliente is much smaller than Santiago, but is also charming and traditional.  It also hosts a wonderful old church, worth a look-see and a definite photo-op.
Continuing west again, you will be on the last leg of the journey to the hot springs. You will enter the biosphere of the Sierra Laguna.  The biosphere is the Mexican equivalent to a State park in the wilderness or a National Park.  The environment, including the flora and fauna are protected, and activities in the biosphere are restricted by law.  (Be respectful, take out what you take in!)  At this point, there is an entrance ¨gate¨. The Ejido of El Chorro, man this gate and charge an entrance fee, usually about 20 pesos a person.  If you want to continue on, be prepared to pay the fee.  From the appearance of the area, especially the hot springs, which on Sundays, is filled with families picnicking and enjoying the warm waters, the fee it well worthy the payment!  For such a well used



destination, it is surprising clean and well maintained. After paying your entrance fee, you will drive to the end of the road, where you can find parking on the side of the road.
  
The hot springs are located on the west side of a small dam. The Presa (dam) of El Chorro, or sometimes called the Presa of Agua Caliente was built in the 1950´s by the Mexican governmental equivalent of the Army Corp of Engineers.  It is a short dam (as opposed to tall) and therefore serves no purpose to generate electricity, there simply is not enough height for the water to fall to do so.  Being unsuccessful in finding additional information about this dam, I can only conclude that it was probably built to regulate the flow of water to the east, where and farmlands below this area are in the direct path of flood waters from hurricanes and storms.

The water around the dam is very warm.  There are bubbling ¨hot¨ spots close to the rocks where the temperatures are much higher.  Sit directly over the bubbles, and enjoy natures´ hot tub!  For those of you seeking an adventure, hike along the river bed further into the canyon.  There are several pools and waterfalls to enjoy in relative seclusion.  If you plan on hiking, come early, bring water and a picnic.  You can go as far as you like,  The ravine and the water go for miles!  The canyon is also filled with trees, including oaks, lupines and lush vegetation, reminiscent to me of the lower canyons in So. California. 

A word of caution:  As with all natural water, whether in Mexico, the US or Canada, do not drink from the river.  Many animals, including cows use the streams.  Drinking the water may cause internal parasites, or other diseases.  Bring a fresh water source to drink.

There are additional hot springs located in nearby San Jorge – have your own adventure to find these!  If you find them, let me know!

Road Trip difficulty:  Medium – 4 wheel drive not required. 

                               
  




















 





































 

OFF THE BEATEN PATH  (Or the road less travelled  -  you choose)
Every Sunday, dirt roads throughout Baja beckon me.  My trusty grandson, Gabriel and I find some of the most secluded, beautiful places in Baja…Allow us share our experiences with you each issue.  If you have a great spot off the beaten path, let me know, we´d love to check it out and share.
.
Hot Springs in Baja: EL Chorro
Tired Muscles?  Stressed out?  Want a different place to enjoy the water in Baja?  Want different scenery? A short drive past Agua Caliente on the east side of the peninsula, is a hidden wilderness hot spring (agua termales) that can help relieve that tension!

The hot springs are located at the road´s end of the canyon about 6km northwest of the small, charming pueblo of Agua Caliente.  (Don´t worry, there are no major turn-offs from Agua Caliente to the hot springs, to make this difficult!)  Agua Caliente and Santiago are farming communities west of Highway 1. To get there, head north from San Jose on Highway 1.  The Santiago turnoff is well past the airport, and Miraflores, but, it is on a well marked, paved road going to the west from the main highway.  Santiago is a traditional Mexican farming pueblo, with the obligatory town plaza, and a very charming old church.  La Laguna, right adjacent to Santiago proper, even has a marshy lagoon filled with spectacular water reeds, cattails, hyacinth and palms.  And the area is green and lush; another excellent photo opportunity. Spend some time in Santiago, its tranquillity and simple charm will rub off!  

Santiago is also home to the only zoo in all of Baja Sur, that I know of.  The zoo is northwest of the town plaza, and the directions are well marked with signs.  It is a very simple zoo, hosting a fraction of the animals you would see in big cities, but, being the only zoo in all of Baja California Sur, it is well used by families, especially on the weekend.  In fact, my grandson, Gabriel, who is my regular Sunday exploring buddy (2-1/2 years old), experienced his first zoo, right there!  His little eyes, became as big as saucers and the squeals of joy and delight he made seeing these animals, was echoed throughout the park by Mexican children enjoying their new discoveries as well.  It is worth a visit.  But be sure and drop some money in the collection box when you leave.  The zoo is free, but I am told, that the animals´ food and care comes directly from the donations made in this box.  Be generous.

When you are ready, continue on the zoo road, which, immediately after the zoo becomes a serviced dirt road to Agua Caliente is about 8 kms west of Santiago.  Keep on the main dirt road.  You will not get lost. 

Agua Caliente is much smaller than Santiago, but is also charming and traditional.  It also hosts a wonderful old church, worth a look-see and a definite photo-op.
Continuing west again, you will be on the last leg of the journey to the hot springs. You will enter the biosphere of the Sierra Laguna.  The biosphere is the Mexican equivalent to a State park in the wilderness or a National Park.  The environment, including the flora and fauna are protected, and activities in the biosphere are restricted by law.  (Be respectful, take out what you take in!)  At this point, there is an entrance ¨gate¨. The Ejido of El Chorro, man this gate and charge an entrance fee, usually about 20 pesos a person.  If you want to continue on, be prepared to pay the fee.  From the appearance of the area, especially the hot springs, which on Sundays, is filled with families picnicking and enjoying the warm waters, the fee it well worthy the payment!  For such a well used destination, it is surprising clean and well maintained. After paying your entrance fee, you will drive to the end of the road, where you can find parking on the side of the road.
  
The hot springs are located on the west side of a small dam. The Presa (dam) of El Chorro, or sometimes called the Presa of Agua Caliente was built in the 1950´s by the Mexican governmental equivalent of the Army Corp of Engineers.  It is a short dam (as opposed to tall) and therefore serves no purpose to generate electricity, there simply is not enough height for the water to fall to do so.  Being unsuccessful in finding additional information about this dam, I can only conclude that it was probably built to regulate the flow of water to the east, where and farmlands below this area are in the direct path of flood waters from hurricanes and storms.

The water around the dam is very warm.  There are bubbling ¨hot¨ spots close to the rocks where the temperatures are much higher.  Sit directly over the bubbles, and enjoy natures´ hot tub!  For those of you seeking an adventure, hike along the river bed further into the canyon.  There are several pools and waterfalls to enjoy in relative seclusion.  If you plan on hiking, come early, bring water and a picnic.  You can go as far as you like,  The ravine and the water go for miles!  The canyon is also filled with trees, including oaks, lupines and lush vegetation, reminiscent to me of the lower canyons in So. California. 

A word of caution:  As with all natural water, whether in Mexico, the US or Canada, do not drink from the river.  Many animals, including cows use the streams.  Drinking the water may cause internal parasites, or other diseases.  Bring a fresh water source to drink.

There are additional hot springs located in nearby San Jorge – have your own adventure to find these!  If you find them, let me know!

Road Trip difficulty:  Medium – 4 wheel drive not required. 
                                    Regular road cars OK.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH  (Or the road less travelled  -  you choose)
Every Sunday, dirt roads throughout Baja beckon me.  My trusty grandson, Gabriel and I find some of the most secluded, beautiful places in Baja…Allow us share our experiences with you each issue.  If you have a great spot off the beaten path, let me know, we´d love to check it out and share.
.
Hot Springs in Baja: EL Chorro
Tired Muscles?  Stressed out?  Want a different place to enjoy the water in Baja?  Want different scenery? A short drive past Agua Caliente on the east side of the peninsula, is a hidden wilderness hot spring (agua termales) that can help relieve that tension!

The hot springs are located at the road´s end of the canyon about 6km northwest of the small, charming pueblo of Agua Caliente.  (Don´t worry, there are no major turn-offs from Agua Caliente to the hot springs, to make this difficult!)  Agua Caliente and Santiago are farming communities west of Highway 1. To get there, head north from San Jose on Highway 1.  The Santiago turnoff is well past the airport, and Miraflores, but, it is on a well marked, paved road going to the west from the main highway.  Santiago is a traditional Mexican farming pueblo, with the obligatory town plaza, and a very charming old church.  La Laguna, right adjacent to Santiago proper, even has a marshy lagoon filled with spectacular water reeds, cattails, hyacinth and palms.  And the area is green and lush; another excellent photo opportunity. Spend some time in Santiago, its tranquillity and simple charm will rub off!  

Santiago is also home to the only zoo in all of Baja Sur, that I know of.  The zoo is northwest of the town plaza, and the directions are well marked with signs.  It is a very simple zoo, hosting a fraction of the animals you would see in big cities, but, being the only zoo in all of Baja California Sur, it is well used by families, especially on the weekend.  In fact, my grandson, Gabriel, who is my regular Sunday exploring buddy (2-1/2 years old), experienced his first zoo, right there!  His little eyes, became as big as saucers and the squeals of joy and delight he made seeing these animals, was echoed throughout the park by Mexican children enjoying their new discoveries as well.  It is worth a visit.  But be sure and drop some money in the collection box when you leave.  The zoo is free, but I am told, that the animals´ food and care comes directly from the donations made in this box.  Be generous.

When you are ready, continue on the zoo road, which, immediately after the zoo becomes a serviced dirt road to Agua Caliente is about 8 kms west of Santiago.  Keep on the main dirt road.  You will not get lost. 

Agua Caliente is much smaller than Santiago, but is also charming and traditional.  It also hosts a wonderful old church, worth a look-see and a definite photo-op.
Continuing west again, you will be on the last leg of the journey to the hot springs. You will enter the biosphere of the Sierra Laguna.  The biosphere is the Mexican equivalent to a State park in the wilderness or a National Park.  The environment, including the flora and fauna are protected, and activities in the biosphere are restricted by law.  (Be respectful, take out what you take in!)  At this point, there is an entrance ¨gate¨. The Ejido of El Chorro, man this gate and charge an entrance fee, usually about 20 pesos a person.  If you want to continue on, be prepared to pay the fee.  From the appearance of the area, especially the hot springs, which on Sundays, is filled with families picnicking and enjoying the warm waters, the fee it well worthy the payment!  For such a well used destination, it is surprising clean and well maintained. After paying your entrance fee, you will drive to the end of the road, where you can find parking on the side of the road.
  
The hot springs are located on the west side of a small dam. The Presa (dam) of El Chorro, or sometimes called the Presa of Agua Caliente was built in the 1950´s by the Mexican governmental equivalent of the Army Corp of Engineers.  It is a short dam (as opposed to tall) and therefore serves no purpose to generate electricity, there simply is not enough height for the water to fall to do so.  Being unsuccessful in finding additional information about this dam, I can only conclude that it was probably built to regulate the flow of water to the east, where and farmlands below this area are in the direct path of flood waters from hurricanes and storms.

The water around the dam is very warm.  There are bubbling ¨hot¨ spots close to the rocks where the temperatures are much higher.  Sit directly over the bubbles, and enjoy natures´ hot tub!  For those of you seeking an adventure, hike along the river bed further into the canyon.  There are several pools and waterfalls to enjoy in relative seclusion.  If you plan on hiking, come early, bring water and a picnic.  You can go as far as you like,  The ravine and the water go for miles!  The canyon is also filled with trees, including oaks, lupines and lush vegetation, reminiscent to me of the lower canyons in So. California. 

A word of caution:  As with all natural water, whether in Mexico, the US or Canada, do not drink from the river.  Many animals, including cows use the streams.  Drinking the water may cause internal parasites, or other diseases.  Bring a fresh water source to drink.

There are additional hot springs located in nearby San Jorge – have your own adventure to find these!  If you find them, let me know!

Road Trip difficulty:  Medium – 4 wheel drive not required. 
                                    Regular road cars OK.

OFF THE BEATEN PATH  (Or the road less travelled  -  you choose)
Every Sunday, dirt roads throughout Baja beckon me.  My trusty grandson, Gabriel and I find some of the most secluded, beautiful places in Baja…Allow us share our experiences with you each issue.  If you have a great spot off the beaten path, let me know, we´d love to check it out and share.
.
Hot Springs in Baja: EL Chorro
Tired Muscles?  Stressed out?  Want a different place to enjoy the water in Baja?  Want different scenery? A short drive past Agua Caliente on the east side of the peninsula, is a hidden wilderness hot spring (agua termales) that can help relieve that tension!

The hot springs are located at the road´s end of the canyon about 6km northwest of the small, charming pueblo of Agua Caliente.  (Don´t worry, there are no major turn-offs from Agua Caliente to the hot springs, to make this difficult!)  Agua Caliente and Santiago are farming communities west of Highway 1. To get there, head north from San Jose on Highway 1.  The Santiago turnoff is well past the airport, and Miraflores, but, it is on a well marked, paved road going to the west from the main highway.  Santiago is a traditional Mexican farming pueblo, with the obligatory town plaza, and a very charming old church.  La Laguna, right adjacent to Santiago proper, even has a marshy lagoon filled with spectacular water reeds, cattails, hyacinth and palms.  And the area is green and lush; another excellent photo opportunity. Spend some time in Santiago, its tranquillity and simple charm will rub off!  

Santiago is also home to the only zoo in all of Baja Sur, that I know of.  The zoo is northwest of the town plaza, and the directions are well marked with signs.  It is a very simple zoo, hosting a fraction of the animals you would see in big cities, but, being the only zoo in all of Baja California Sur, it is well used by families, especially on the weekend.  In fact, my grandson, Gabriel, who is my regular Sunday exploring buddy (2-1/2 years old), experienced his first zoo, right there!  His little eyes, became as big as saucers and the squeals of joy and delight he made seeing these animals, was echoed throughout the park by Mexican children enjoying their new discoveries as well.  It is worth a visit.  But be sure and drop some money in the collection box when you leave.  The zoo is free, but I am told, that the animals´ food and care comes directly from the donations made in this box.  Be generous.

When you are ready, continue on the zoo road, which, immediately after the zoo becomes a serviced dirt road to Agua Caliente is about 8 kms west of Santiago.  Keep on the main dirt road.  You will not get lost. 

Agua Caliente is much smaller than Santiago, but is also charming and traditional.  It also hosts a wonderful old church, worth a look-see and a definite photo-op.
Continuing west again, you will be on the last leg of the journey to the hot springs. You will enter the biosphere of the Sierra Laguna.  The biosphere is the Mexican equivalent to a State park in the wilderness or a National Park.  The environment, including the flora and fauna are protected, and activities in the biosphere are restricted by law.  (Be respectful, take out what you take in!)  At this point, there is an entrance ¨gate¨. The Ejido of El Chorro, man this gate and charge an entrance fee, usually about 20 pesos a person.  If you want to continue on, be prepared to pay the fee.  From the appearance of the area, especially the hot springs, which on Sundays, is filled with families picnicking and enjoying the warm waters, the fee it well worthy the payment!  For such a well used destination, it is surprising clean and well maintained. After paying your entrance fee, you will drive to the end of the road, where you can find parking on the side of the road.
  
The hot springs are located on the west side of a small dam. The Presa (dam) of El Chorro, or sometimes called the Presa of Agua Caliente was built in the 1950´s by the Mexican governmental equivalent of the Army Corp of Engineers.  It is a short dam (as opposed to tall) and therefore serves no purpose to generate electricity, there simply is not enough height for the water to fall to do so.  Being unsuccessful in finding additional information about this dam, I can only conclude that it was probably built to regulate the flow of water to the east, where and farmlands below this area are in the direct path of flood waters from hurricanes and storms.

The water around the dam is very warm.  There are bubbling ¨hot¨ spots close to the rocks where the temperatures are much higher.  Sit directly over the bubbles, and enjoy natures´ hot tub!  For those of you seeking an adventure, hike along the river bed further into the canyon.  There are several pools and waterfalls to enjoy in relative seclusion.  If you plan on hiking, come early, bring water and a picnic.  You can go as far as you like,  The ravine and the water go for miles!  The canyon is also filled with trees, including oaks, lupines and lush vegetation, reminiscent to me of the lower canyons in So. California. 

A word of caution:  As with all natural water, whether in Mexico, the US or Canada, do not drink from the river.  Many animals, including cows use the streams.  Drinking the water may cause internal parasites, or other diseases.  Bring a fresh water source to drink.

There are additional hot springs located in nearby San Jorge – have your own adventure to find these!  If you find them, let me know!

Road Trip difficulty:  Medium – 4 wheel drive not required. 
                                    Regular road cars OK.
Tired Muscles?  Stressed out?  Want a different place to enjoy the water in Baja?  Want different scenery? A short drive past Agua Caliente on the east side of the peninsula, is a hidden wilderness hot spring (agua termales) that can help relieve that tension!

The hot springs are located at the road´s end of the canyon about 6km northwest of the small, charming pueblo of Agua Caliente.  (Don´t worry, there are no major turn-offs from Agua Caliente to the hot springs, to make this difficult!)  Agua Caliente and Santiago are farming communities west of Highway 1. To get there, head north from San Jose on Highway 1.  The Santiago turnoff is well past the airport, and Miraflores, but, it is on a well marked, paved road going to the west from the main highway.  Santiago is a traditional Mexican farming pueblo, with the obligatory town plaza, and a very charming old church.  La Laguna, right adjacent to Santiago proper, even has a marshy lagoon filled with spectacular water reeds, cattails, hyacinth and palms.  And the area is green and lush; another excellent photo opportunity. Spend some time in Santiago, its tranquillity and simple charm will rub off!  

Santiago is also home to the only zoo in all of Baja Sur, that I know of.  The zoo is northwest of the town plaza, and the directions are well marked with signs.  It is a very simple zoo, hosting a fraction of the animals you would see in big cities, but, being the only zoo in all of Baja California Sur, it is well used by families, especially on the weekend.  In fact, my grandson, Gabriel, who is my regular Sunday exploring buddy (2-1/2 years old), experienced his first zoo, right there!  His little eyes, became as big as saucers and the squeals of joy and delight he made seeing these animals, was echoed throughout the park by Mexican children enjoying their new discoveries as well.  It is worth a visit.  But be sure and drop some money in the collection box when you leave.  The zoo is free, but I am told, that the animals´ food and care comes directly from the donations made in this box.  Be generous.

When you are ready, continue on the zoo road, which, immediately after the zoo becomes a serviced dirt road to Agua Caliente is about 8 kms west of Santiago.  Keep on the main dirt road.  You will not get lost. 

Agua Caliente is much smaller than Santiago, but is also charming and traditional.  It also hosts a wonderful old church, worth a look-see and a definite photo-op.
Continuing west again, you will be on the last leg of the journey to the hot springs. You will enter the biosphere of the Sierra Laguna.  The biosphere is the Mexican equivalent to a State park in the wilderness or a National Park.  The environment, including the flora and fauna are protected, and activities in the biosphere are restricted by law.  (Be respectful, take out what you take in!)  At this point, there is an entrance ¨gate¨. The Ejido of El Chorro, man this gate and charge an entrance fee, usually about 20 pesos a person.  If you want to continue on, be prepared to pay the fee.  From the appearance of the area, especially the hot springs, which on Sundays, is filled with families picnicking and enjoying the warm waters, the fee it well worthy the payment!  For such a well used destination, it is surprising clean and well maintained. After paying your entrance fee, you will drive to the end of the road, where you can find parking on the side of the road.
  
The hot springs are located on the west side of a small dam. The Presa (dam) of El Chorro, or sometimes called the Presa of Agua Caliente was built in the 1950´s by the Mexican governmental equivalent of the Army Corp of Engineers.  It is a short dam (as opposed to tall) and therefore serves no purpose to generate electricity, there simply is not enough height for the water to fall to do so.  Being unsuccessful in finding additional information about this dam, I can only conclude that it was probably built to regulate the flow of water to the east, where and farmlands below this area are in the direct path of flood waters from hurricanes and storms.

The water around the dam is very warm.  There are bubbling ¨hot¨ spots close to the rocks where the temperatures are much higher.  Sit directly over the bubbles, and enjoy natures´ hot tub!  For those of you seeking an adventure, hike along the river bed further into the canyon.  There are several pools and waterfalls to enjoy in relative seclusion.  If you plan on hiking, come early, bring water and a picnic.  You can go as far as you like,  The ravine and the water go for miles!  The canyon is also filled with trees, including oaks, lupines and lush vegetation, reminiscent to me of the lower canyons in So. California. 

A word of caution:  As with all natural water, whether in Mexico, the US or Canada, do not drink from the river.  Many animals, including cows use the streams.  Drinking the water may cause internal parasites, or other diseases.  Bring a fresh water source to drink.

There are additional hot springs located in nearby San Jorge – have your own adventure to find these!  If you find them, let me know!

Road Trip difficulty:  Medium – 4 wheel drive not required. 
                                    Regular road cars OK.